SCAVI News

SCAVI NEWS – January 2020
A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
Facebook:
https://m.facebook.com/The-South-Central-Association-of-the-Visually-Impaired
Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh.
Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065
Cell 317-435-8216, e-mail rvonderhaar@att.net

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, January 6, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Kari Goodman is doing a presentation on helping the visually impaired use an iPhone.

SCAVI BIRTHDAYS

Doug Eads Jan. 1
Louise Hamilton Jan. 14

A VERY GOOD YEAR

2019 was a very good year for the South Central Association of the Visually
Impaired. We had several meetings with informative speakers and
presentations. Two of our members completed rehabilitation training for the
visually impaired, and we made sure all our members had access to needed
equipment. Our membership has continued to grow. We finished the year with
a wonderful chili supper which was a fun evening for the public and raised
$1,275. In all these activities our goal is to be the best help to the
visually impaired community as we can be.

EN-VISION AMERICA FOUNDER PASSES

PALMETTO, Fla., November 25, 2019 – It’s with great sadness, En-Vision
America announces the passing of their beloved company founder Phil
Raistrick. He sadly and suddenly passed on November 20, 2019. Phil was a
giant of a man and a visionary who was dedicated to providing those with
vision impairment greater independence through technology.

The company began in Phil’s basement. Phil and his two visually impaired brothers loved playing poker. While one knew the Braille, the other did not. That spark fed the flame that would become En-Vision America.

The I.D. Mate, a talking barcode scanner, was born in 1996. Phil worked
closely on developing the program that would evolve to the bar code scanner
that we know and love today. It is tool that allows individuals with a
vision impairment to barcode items and use the reader to identify these
objects. In addition to allowing his brothers to better play poker, now they
could identify millions of items that can be found in grocery stores today.

Not long after the barcode scanner, Phil worked on the problem of
medication safety with the introduction of ScripTalk, a talking
prescription reader. This system has expanded into tens of thousands of
pharmacies throughout the nation and Canada and has evolved to include large
print labels, Braille labels, dual-language labels and Controlled Substance
Safety Labels.

“With all his heart, Phil loved this company and what we stand for,” says
David Raistrick, En-Vision America’s Vice President. “We stood
shoulder-to-shoulder with him to make a difference in the lives of others.
It is because of him that we will carry on helping so many people around
this world.”

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South-Central Association of the Visually Impaired was
held on Monday, November 4, 2019 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free
Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari Goodman,
Cindy Brooking, Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Doug Eads, Mike and
Dolly Sowder, Jim Veem and Kathy Reising.

Regina opened the meeting by having everyone introduce themselves.

Donna Pruitt was our speaker. She talked to the group about suicide
prevention. She shared statistics about suicide and offered information on
how to help people who are at risk.

October Minutes

Dolly made a motion to approve the minutes from the October meeting.
Cindy seconded the motion. The motion passed unanimously.

Treasurer’s Report

We received $22 in the sunshine bag, $60 in convention registrations,
$1400 from the chili supper. Total income for October is $1482.13.
Expenses included chili supper expenses of $42.76 and a $50 reimbursement
for Maggie’s convention registration. Total expenses for October are
$92.76. Balance is $4443.10. For the chili supper we collected $1127 in
ticket sales and donations and $510 from the auction. Total income from
chili supper was $1637. Expenses for the chili supper were $125 for the
room rental and $261.87 for supplies. Total profit for the evening was
$1275.13.

Regina discussed the possibility of caroling at Garden Villa on December
11 at 2:30. After some discussion it was decided Regina would contact
everyone to see if they were interested in doing this.

Elections

The slate of candidates is as follows:

President – Regina

Vice-President – Sue

Secretary – Kari

Treasurer – Cindy

Board Members – Brenda (1 year), Denise (2 year) and Cliff (3 year).

The slate of candidates above was presented to the group. Rita made a
motion to approve the slate as presented last month. Kari seconded the
motion. The motion passed unanimously.

Cindy will be renting a 12-passenger van to drive everyone to Columbus,
Ohio for convention. She will be driving the Bedford and the Bloomington
group. We also discussed door prizes and auction items for convention.

Reminder to pay dues for next year.

Dolly made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Kari seconded the motion.
The motion passed unanimously. We adjourned the meeting at 10:45 am.

Our next meeting will be our Christmas party at noon on December 14.
Meat, drinks and paper products will be provided. Bring a side dish or a
dessert. If you want to participate in the gift exchange bring a small gift
worth no more than $5.

Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman

SCAVI NEWS for October 2019
A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/The-South-Central-Association-of-the-Visually-Impaired
Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh.
Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065, cell 317-435-8216 or e-mail rvonderhaar@att.net
November 2019
WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI
Our next meeting will be Monday, November 4, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our speaker will be Donna Pruitt from Suicide Prevention.
SCAVI BIRTHDAYS
Rita Kersh Nov. 2
Jon Knoll Nov. 16
Joy Goen Nov. 29
VERY SUCCESSFUL CHILI SUPPER
Thanks to all those who cooked, served, set up tables, sold tickets, and also the wonderful friends who came and supported us at our chili supper on October 15th. We all truly made this one of the biggest and best ever with the most fun had by all. We have the chili supper on White Cane Safety Day. This was our third year. It has grown to be a real fun event in our community. It is unique in that it is entirely done by SCAVI members and friends.
ACB NEWS
Below is a news release from Hulu on October 3 regarding accessibility per an agreement with ACB.
At Hula, we’ve been working to deliver a more accessible experience so that all viewers can stream their favorite shows and movies to their heart’s content. As part of these efforts, we made accessible design the main focus of our summer hackathon and launched an audio description hub on our web platform earlier this year. The audio description hub allows viewers to find content with audio descriptions quickly and easily. And the changes don’t stop there.
Today, we’re announcing more improvements to our accessibility features on Hulu.
A before and after view of our text legibility improvements
For this round of improvements, we focused on text legibility and screen reader capabilities. Viewers will experience easier-to-read text as we’ve enhanced the text opacity to improve readability. This update will be applied automatically for all our users.
To enable the screen reader — also referred to as the audio guide on some devices — head over to your device’s settings to turn on the feature. Screen readers assist viewers with visual impairments by vocally guiding them through the Hulu platform.
These updates will be available on the Roku® platform starting today and will continue rolling out to Android, tvOS, iOS and more living room devices in the coming weeks.
SCAVI MINUTES
The meeting of the South-Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held on Monday, October 7, 2019 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari and Cliff Goodman, Cindy Brooking, Sue Fleener, Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Doug and Brenda Eads, Mike and Dolly Sowder, Barry Singleton, Joy Goen, Lonnie and Ida Galey, Don and Betty Shackmann, Denise Mullis and John Knoll.
Regina opened the meeting by having everyone introduce themselves.
September Minutes
Brenda made a motion to approve the minutes from the September meeting. Rita seconded the motion. The motion passed.
Treasurer’s Report
We received $0.13 in interest and $30 in the sunshine bag. Expenses were $50 for a marathon gas card for our speaker in September, $23.54 for a new white cane for John and $112.50 for a deposit to use the First Baptist Church for our chili supper. Balance is $3083.73.
The group discussed details regarding the chili supper we will be hosting on October 15. Dolly reviewed the list of what each person volunteered to bring. We will begin setting up at 3:00.
The group discussed the fall convention coming up in November. Rita made a motion to have SCAVI rent a van for transportation to the convention. Dolly seconded. All were in favor. The motion passed. Once registration is live, members will let Cindy know if they want to register and she will register everyone online.
Nominating Committee
The slate of candidates is as follows:
President: Regina
Vice-President – Sue
Secretary – Kari
Treasurer – Cindy
Board Members – Brenda (1 year), Denise (2 year) and Cliff (3 year).
The sunshine bag was passed around.
We reserved the church basement for the Christmas party for December 14.
Our next meeting will be on November 4 at 9:30 a.m. in the basement at the Bedford Free Methodist Church.
John made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Rich seconded the motion. The motion passed.
We adjourned the meeting at 10:25 am.
Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman

SCAVI NEWS for September 2019

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually
Impaired. SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by
Rita Kersh. Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065
Cell 317-435-8216 or Email Regina Vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, September 9, at the Bedford Free Methodist
Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M.
Our speaker will be Dawnetta Richardson from the Bosma Connections program in Indianapolis.

SCAVI September BIRTHDAYS

Sally Ridge Sept. 2 | Ida Galey Sept. 15 | Brenda Eads Sept. 15 | Regina Vonderhaar Sept. 24

SCAVI October 15 CHILI SUPPER

Don’t forget to mark your calendar for Tuesday, October 15 from 4:30-7:00 p.m. for our chili supper. It will be held at the Bedford First Baptist Church, 1515 20th St., Bedford. Last year we made about $1,000 on this event. Brenda is calling members to see what jobs they can help with. It takes everyone who is able to make this a successful fund raiser. The tickets will be available at our September 9 meeting for members to take and sell. If you need tickets, but can’t make the meeting, call Cindy (812-797-2185) and she’ll get some tickets to you. More details will be discussed at our September 9 meeting, so please plan to be there if possible. Also keep in mind that White Cane Safety Day falls on the same day as our supper so we want to promote that as well.

ACB NEWS

Walmart and Sam’s Club are deeply committed to accessibility and medication
safety for their blind, visually impaired and print-impaired pharmacy
patients. To enhance their commitment, Walmart and Sam’s Club pharmacies
provide En-Vision America’s ScripTalk audible (i.e. “talking”) prescription
labels at Walmart and Sam’s Club pharmacies across the United States.

Since 2012, Walmart and Sam’s Club have equipped almost 1,200 of their
pharmacies to provide ScripTalk audible prescription labels at a patient’s
request. More than 750 pharmacies have been equipped in just the past three
years with 25 additional Walmart and Sam’s Club pharmacies (on average) set
up to provide ScripTalk labels each month.

The American Council of the Blind is excited Walmart and Sam’s Club are
showing their dedication to the safety and accessibility for the visually
impaired through ScripTalk availability, setting an important standard in
accessibility in healthcare. Our relationship with Walmart has flourished
over the years, and we look forward to continued growth.

Walmart and Sam’s Club equips a pharmacy to provide ScripTalk upon a single patient’s request for audible prescription labels. Once a pharmacy is equipped, usually within 7-10 days, the pharmacy provides ScripTalk labels to patients requesting them at no charge and without lengthy delays.

“The ScripTalk system is important to providing convenient and safe healthcare for our customers,” said JoAnn Stevens, Senior Director of Health & Wellness Compliance at Walmart. “We are proud this technology is available at Walmart and Sam’s Club locations across the nation, and we look forward
to adding more locations as patients ask for this free service at their local Walmart or Sam’s Club pharmacy. This service is free and available at all U.S. locations upon request.”

The ScripTalk labeling system, the industry leader in audible prescription
labels, was developed by En-Vision America. To provide ScripTalk labels to
their patients, the pharmacy places a RFID label on the bottom of a
patient’s prescription bottle. The patient then places the bottle on a
small, battery operated device called a ScripTalk Station, which is provided
at no charge to the patient. The ScripTalk Station reads the prescription
information out loud to the patient, including patient name, prescription
number, drug name, dosage, use instructions, warnings, educational leaflets,
and pharmacy information. “We already have almost 1,200 Walmart stores and Sam’s Clubs offering the
ScripTalk system,” says Amanda Tolson, a director of En-Vision America, maker of the ScripTalk system. “Walmart is a leader in disability rights and we’re pleased to grow our partnership to benefit the visually impaired community.”

SCAVI August Minutes

The meeting of the South-Central Association of the Visually Impaired was
held on Monday, August 5, 2019 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free
Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari and
Cliff Goodman, Cindy Brooking, Sue Fleener, Rich Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh,
Denise Mullis, Doug and Brenda Eads, Mike and Dolly Sowder, Betty and Don
Schackmann, Jim Veem, Barry Singleton, Joy Goen, Lonnie and Ida Galey, John
Knoll and Sally Ridge. Sue opened the meeting by having everyone introduce themselves.

July Minutes: Rita made a motion to approve the minutes from the July meeting. Brenda
seconded the motion. The motion passed.

Treasurer’s Report

We had $0.14 interest in the month of July. $16 was collected for the sunshine bag. Ending balance was $3165.50. There were no expenses. Rich
made a motion to approve the treasurer’s report. Doug seconded the motion. The motion passed.

New Business

Brenda asked the group if we were interested in having a chili supper this fall. A group discussion took place. Brenda will be the chairperson for the chili supper, Cindy will make tickets, Kari will create a Face book event and Rita will place advertisements in the paper and on the radio. Rita will check to see if First Baptist Church is available on October 15 and let the group know. We discussed serving food from 4:30-7:00. The group also decided to have a silent auction this year as well. Brenda made a motion to hold a chili supper in October. John seconded the motion. The motion passed.

Sue passed out business cards for American Council of the Blind of Indiana. These cards can be used to share with others who may need support. Kari Goodman shared four of the items she learned about while at her vision rehab program at Bosma. She shared the locking lid pot, a liquid level indicator, a talking calculator and the pen friend. Kari answered questions about the products and other questions about her experience at Bosma. Kari also shared about the joint Indiana/Ohio convention happening November 15-17. The convention is in Columbus, Ohio at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Room
rates are $104 per night. Rita shared that we need to start discussing
auction items and transportation for convention. Cindy shared that the
chapter will pay $50 for each member that would like to attend. During the September meeting we will work on making definite plans for attending convention. The sunshine bag was passed around.

Our next meeting will be on September 9 at 9:30 a.m. in the basement at the Bedford Free Methodist Church. Rita made a motion to adjourn the meeting. John seconded the motion. The motion passed. We adjourned the meeting at 10:25 am. Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman.

SCAVI NEWS for July 2019
A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually
Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
Facebook:
SCAVI NEWS for June 2019

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired.
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook
Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh. Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065
Cell 317-435-8216. email Regina Vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be our picnic held on Saturday June 1st, at the Thornton park shelter house at noon. Take the entrance behind the Boy’s Club. Please bring a side dish or dessert. The meat, drinks and paper products will be provided. If you’d like to play the trivia game, bring a new or slightly used item in a bag. Be ready for a good time!

SCAVI BIRTHDAYS

Dale Thomas June 4th

DUKE ENERGY CAUTIONS CUSTOMERS TO GUARD AGAINST UTILITY SCAMMERS

Duke Energy is warning its customers in Indiana to be on guard against phone calls from utility scammers who are demanding that customers pay their electric bill immediately or risk having their electric service disconnected within the hour.

Local law enforcement officials say the number of scam calls reported by citizens has increased in the past few days.
“These scammers are thieves who prey on unsuspecting customers with the sole purpose of stealing their money,” said Marvin Blade, Indiana vice president of community relations for Duke Energy.

“The scammers typically target elderly residents or small family-owned businesses, including restaurants, repair shops or other retail businesses.”
The best way to defend yourself against these scammers is to recognize how the scam works and understand that Duke Energy never asks customers for prepaid debit cards.

Typically, the customer receives an unsolicited phone call from an individual who falsely claims to be a Duke Energy representative demanding immediate payment, usually in the form of a prepaid debit card. Scammers have even duplicated the Duke Energy upfront Interactive Voice Response system, so when customers call back phone numbers provided by the scammer, it sounds like a legitimate Duke Energy phone number. Some of these criminals also use caller-ID spoofing to replicate Duke Energy’s customer service number.

Red flags for scam activity

The caller becomes angry and tells the customer his or her account is past due and service will be disconnected if a large payment isn’t made – usually within the hour. The caller instructs the customer to purchase a pre-paid debit or credit card – widely available at retail stores – then call him or her back to supposedly make a payment to Duke Energy. The scammer asks the customer for the prepaid card’s receipt number and PIN number, which grants instant access to the card’s funds. The customer has received no other notice from Duke Energy that an account is overdue.

How to protect yourself: Duke Energy never asks or requires a customer with a delinquent account to purchase a prepaid debit card – or iTunes card — to avoid disconnection. Customers can make payments online, by phone, automatic bank draft, mail or in person at any number of retail outlets. Customers with delinquent accounts receive advance disconnection notification with the regular monthly billing – never a single notification one hour before disconnection. Customers who suspect or experience fraud, or feel threatened during contact with one of these thieves, should contact local law enforcement authorities and then the Duke Energy Indiana phone number listed on their bill (800.521.2232).

BRAILLE LEGGO BRICKS FOR CHILDREN

Lego has unveiled a new project aimed at helping blind and visually impaired children learn Braille in a “playful and engaging way.” Lego Braille Bricks, a concept originally proposed to the toy company by two charities, will allow children to learn the touch writing system through play.
The bricks, which will launch fully in 2020, feature the studs used for characters in the Braille alphabet, as well as printed characters allowing sighted people to read the bricks. They will be “fully compatible” with existing Lego bricks, the company said in a press release.

Lego Braille Bricks will feature the Braille alphabet as well as numbers, math symbols and teaching devices.
The Danish Association of the Blind suggested the concept to the Lego Foundation in 2011, while the Dorina Nowill Foundation for the Blind, based in Brazil, proposed the bricks in 2017. A spokesperson for Lego told CNN that the company had gone on to develop prototypes with both organizations, as well as the British charities Leonard Cheshire and Royal National Institute of Blind People, and the Norwegian Association of the Blind and Partially Sighted.

The final set will comprise approximately 250 bricks, covering the complete Braille alphabet, numbers from zero to nine, math symbols, as well as “inspiration for teaching and interactive games.”
Braille Bricks are currently undergoing testing in schools in Portuguese, Danish, English and Norwegian, while Spanish, French and German versions will be tested later this year.
They will ultimately be distributed free of charge to institutions through the partner organisations.

Philippe Chazal, treasurer of the European Blind Union, said in a statement: “With thousands of audiobooks and computer programs now available, fewer kids are learning to read Braille.” “This is particularly critical when we know that Braille users often are more independent, have a higher level of education and better employment opportunities,” Chazal continued. “We strongly believe Lego Braille Bricks can help boost the level of interest in learning Braille, so we’re thrilled that the Lego Foundation is making it possible to further this concept and bring it to children around the world.”

Fewer children are learning Braille with the rise of audiobooks and computer programs for visually impaired people. Only 10% of visually impaired children in the US are now learning to read Braille, a 2009 study from the National Federation of the Blind found. According to the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), 1,077 children in England were learning Braille in 2017, out of an estimated 21,900 visually impaired children in the country — just under 5%. However, the real figure is likely to be higher, an RNIB spokesperson explained, as there is no official register for Braille learners.
David Clarke, director of services at the RNIB, said in a statement that the bricks would “improve education for children with vision impairment and encourage inclusion.”
“Thanks to this innovation, children with vision impairment will be able to learn braille and interact with their friends and classmates in a fun way, using play to encourage creativity while learning to read and write,” Clarke added.

Morten Bonde, the senior art director for the Lego Group who is losing his sight to a genetic eye disorder, said in a statement: “Experiencing reactions from both students and teachers to Lego Braille Bricks has been hugely inspirational and reminded me that the only limitations I will meet in life are those I create in my mind.”
“I am moved to see the impact this product has on developing blind and visually impaired children’s academic confidence and curiosity already in its infant days,” Bonde said.

SCAVI Minutes

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held on Monday, May 6, 2019 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari and Cliff Goodman, Cindy Brooking, Sue Fleenor, Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Denise Mullis, Doug and Brenda Eads, Mike and Dolly Sowders, Jim Veem, Barry Singleton and his sister Joy.
Regina opened the meeting by having everyone introduce themselves.
Regina then introduced our speaker, Rhonda Bozikis. Rhonda shared her story about vision loss and how she became a news reporter at a radio station in Evansville. She also shared some of her personal story of growing up visually impaired and raising children. Rhonda also took time to answer any questions that members had.

March Minutes

Dolly made a motion to approve the minutes from the March meeting. Denise seconded the motion. The motion passed. We discussed the Script Talk program. We will be working to see which local pharmacies are participating and publish an article containing that information.

Treasurer’s Report

In March we had an expense of $203 in dues to the state for 29 members. In the month of April, we had washcloth sales of $20. Ending balance of $3228.19.
Regina brought up that Eleanor’s son is creating a scholarship fund for a student wanting to pursue a degree in journalism. She asked if SCAVI was interested in contributing to this fund. Brenda made a motion to contribute $500 to the scholarship fund. Rich seconded the motion. The motion passed. Rita mentioned that the national convention is coming up in July. In the past, our chapter has donated $25 towards the state’s auction item. This year the state will be donating an Amazon gift card. Rita made a motion to donate $25 to the auction item. Sue seconded the motion. The motion passed. Rita also mentioned that Don Koors always walks in the Brenda Dillon memorial walk at national convention. Rita made a motion for SCAVI to donate $25 to the walk. Kari seconded the motion. Rich mentioned that ACBI gets a portion of the proceeds from the money raised during the walk. The motion passed. Regina mentioned that at the March meeting we had discussed having lunch with some of the residents at Garden Villa in May. She asked if we were still interested in doing this. We decided to put this item on hold for the time being. Regina shared that the July meeting will be a celebration meeting for Kari and Lonnie to share their recent experiences in their vision rehab programs. Dolly mentioned that in the near future we should discuss how to make a contribution to the BOSMA senior connections program. Our new members, Barry and Joy, introduced themselves to the group. Our next meeting will be our picnic on June 1 at noon at Thornton Park Shelter House. SCAVI will provide the meat, drinks and paper products. Everyone is welcome to bring sides. There will be a white elephant exchange for anyone interested in participating in a trivia game.
Rich made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Sue seconded the motion. The motion passed. We adjourned the meeting at 10:45 am. Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman

SCAVI NEWS for May 2019
A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook:

https://m.facebook.com/The-South-Central-Association-of-the-Visually-Impaired
Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh.
Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065 or Cell 317-435-8216

 

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI
Our next meeting will be Monday, May 6, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the  Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our speaker will Be Rhonda Bozikis. She is a person  who is visually impaired. She will be talking about her experiences being a News reporter at a  radio station in Evansville, Indiana.

SCAVI BIRTHDAYS
Norma Thomas May 24
Lisa Hoskins May 27
Don Schackmann May 30

ENERGY TIP
A few years ago we had a speaker from Duke Energy who talked about energy saving tips for home  owners. They also provided a home energy assessment which some of our home owners took advantage  of. Part of that assessment included giving away L.E.D. light bulbs. Duke Energy is now giving  those bulbs away free. Any one interested should call 1-800-521-2232.
TOP 10 AIDS FOR MACULAR DEGENERATION
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
This eye disease leads to a loss of both central vision and the ability to see fine details. In  both dry form and wet form AMD, treatment can slow vision loss but not restore vision.
These tools can help you manage and adapt to diminishing eyesight.
1. Bar Magnifier
This 2x magnifier makes it easier to continue reading your favorite magazine or newspaper. At 1″  wide it helps you read line by line. This portable aid even includes a ruler.
2. Deluxe Page Size
Magnifier with Light
If you’d rather magnify the whole page at once, you need this device. The foldable legs stand up  for hands-free reading and fold down for on-the-go use. The 2x magnifier has a light to further  improve viewing.
3. Jumbo Size Braille Phone
Tiny phone buttons can make dialing with vision loss hard. This phone has large numbers with  braille characters to help you dial quickly. The phone has three programmable one-touch emergency  buttons. It even speaks the numbers out loud as you press them, so you can make sure you’re calling  the right person.
4. 15″ Wall Clock with
Large Bold Numbers
Another aid for people with macular degeneration is a clock with larger numbers. The high contrast  background and 2″ high numbers make it easier to read this clock from far away.
5. Keys U Can See Keyboard
Fading vision can make using a computer difficult. The black letters and numbers are striking on  this yellow keyboard. Each character is nearly ½” high, increasing visibility and letting you get  back to typing.
6. Tek Partner Universal
Remote Control
Large buttons helps you see the numbers and other important controls on this remote. It can  connect with up to four other remotes for use with your TV, DVD player, cable box, or VCR. The  buttons also light up for easier visibility at night.
7. Moshi Voice Controlled
Talking Clock
Talking devices are also helpful for people with macular degeneration. This clock is completely  voice controlled, from setting it to using it. Simply ask for the time, date, or indoor temperature  and the clock will announce it loud.
8. Atomic Unisex Talking Watch
If you want to hear the time, day, month, and the date anywhere you go, you need this watch. In  addition to the talking, this watch features large numbers and hour and minute hands that light up  in the dark. This makes it useful for those who are beginning to lose vision or for people whose  vision loss is more advanced.
9. Talking Scale
Visually impaired individuals who are all health conscious will appreciate this glass scale. It  speaks five languages, including English, Spanish, and German, and announces your weight in pounds  or kilograms.
10. Double Vision Vanity
and Suction Cup Mirror
Enjoy two mirrors that offer 5x and 10x magnification. Adjust the gooseneck to the perfect angle  and then apply your makeup, style your hair, or tackle other tasks with ease.

SCAVI MINUTES
The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held March 4, 2019 at  9:30at the Bedford Free Methodist Church. Present were Regina and Rich Vonderhaar, Doug and Brenda  Eads, Denise Mullis, Rita Kersh, Mike and Dolly Sowder, Jon Knoll, Norma Thomas, and Loney and Ida  Galey. Our speaker was Rebecca Chambers, social services director at Garden Villa in Bedford. She  talked to us about some of the assistance they give visually impaired residents in things like  eating, dressing themselves and navigating in their rooms and around the facility. Our own Jon  Knoll, who is a resident there, shared some of his positive experiences. We decided to give raised  dice and bold lined paper from SCAVI to Garden Villa.
We approved February minutes. Dolly Motioned Rita seconded and the motion passed.
Regina talked about our next meeting at Pappas, Walmart grocery pick up, suggestions for future  speakers.
Rita motioned to adjourn, Dolly seconded and the motion passed. Meeting adjourned at 10:15.
Respectfully submitted by Rich Vonderhaar

SCAVI NEWS for April 2019

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook – Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh. Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065, Cell 317-435-8216.
Email Regina Vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, April 1, at Pappas Restaurant, 2615 Mitchell Road at 5:00 P.M. With spring weather coming, let’s enjoy an evening of food and fellowship.

NEW TRANSPORTATION SERVICE

As we always try to share information to help the visually impaired be more independent, we want to share that Lawrence county Personal Transport is a new resource in Lawrence County. Their hours are 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. and they are available on weekends. Rides should be scheduled a day or two in advance. Some of our members have used them and found them helpful, affordable and dependable. If you would like to make a reservation, call 812-578-9432. Their rates are $2.40 to be picked up and includes the first mile. There is a cost of $1.20 for each additional mile. If you would like them to wait, they charge one cent per minute.

MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT BLINDNESS By Kevin McNally

Dear Fully Sighted World,
What you believe about vision loss is false (but do not worry, I am here to help!). This is not your fault. So much of what the normally sighted population is taught (if at all) about low vision is misplaced. To make matters worse, people with low vision as a whole, do not talk about living with it (more on that in future posts). The number of people with, or
impacted by, low vision is on the rise. My main goal is to help educate the fully sighted and empower those with low vision.

I believe fully sighted people have an image of what a “blind” or visually impaired person looks like: Think Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Andrea Bocelli and others. Dark sunglasses, or closed eyes and perhaps a white cane. Yes, these are common indicators of blindness or low vision, but in reality, the number of people with some remaining usable vision far exceeds the number of people who see nothing. Therefore, the vast majority of the visually impaired will not necessarily meet your normal expectations. This is the problem.

The term blind is where the confusion begins. Hard statistics are difficult to come by for a variety of reasons, but according to sources such as the National Federation of the Blind and the American Foundation for the Blind, only an estimated 15% of people with serious vision problems are truly blind, as in no light perception. Technically, it is very rare.
The other way to look at this is that around 85% of people with severe visual impairments have some vision remaining. This can create confusion to the sighted world. I am part of the 85% group. I do not “look” blind. My eye disease is progressive, so if I live long enough, I imagine I will slide into the 15% eventually.

Because the sighted world does not fully understand that most visually impaired have some vision remaining, they are confused when they encounter someone like me. Let me give you an example. Imagine you are at the airport and there I am with my white cane. Now when I travel, I always use my cane so that I can let the rest of the world know that I do not see well.
Therefore, when I accidentally run over your little black luggage that you are pulling behind you as you cut in front of me because you are running to your gate, or the small child splayed out on the floor crying, you will realize (hopefully) that the collision was not on purpose.

Then, as I approach the long snaking security line, I either get pulled from the line
or I enter directly into the handicap line (if I can find it). I get my ID checked, carry-on bag scanned and use my cane to walk to the gate that I will depart from. I check in at the gate, identify myself as legally blind (I am in the airline’s computer) and often get seated in to a special area before boarding. I am then called to board first, many times before people
with other disabilities. I feel the eyes on me as I stand waiting to board first. I board the plane, occasionally with assistance and take my seat. Now stay with me. I then take out my iPhone and check emails, texts and say farewell to loved ones.

As the rest of the passengers start to board and go by me, what do you think they are thinking if they notice me? I know what some are thinking. In fact, I can feel what some are thinking. They are thinking, “wait, isn’t he BLIND??” Their expectations are not lining up with the reality of vision loss. But the absolute truth is that I am legally blind. I am not faking it. I have heavily constricted, but still usuable central vision. Think “tunnel vision.” For fun, you could try looking down an empty toilet paper roll (with the other eye shut) and walking around a busy area. It will not be an enjoyable experience for you. Because of this tunnel vision, I can read and use computers, but anything outside of the central area where I can see will not be visible. I have to continually scan my eyes all over the place to take in as much visual information as possible. Therefore, I need to use a white cane, especially in new and or busy areas, for my safety and yours.

It is the lack of understanding about vision loss that creates the confusion. For example, I have been asked, “why do you wear glasses if you are blind?” This is a logical question, given what I have already written about the natural misinformation of vision loss. For the record, I wear glasses because my usable remaining central vision can still be refracted
like any other person (although my remaining vision is still not as good as the normally sighted due to my degenerating retinas). So like many people, I need glasses to get the best corrected vision possible with what vision I have. These types of questions generally do not bother me. They give me the opportunity to explain true low vision or legal blindness. I think most people, if they are open to learning, will understand much more after I
explain the truth. I do not blame others for being confused or questioning the entire situation. I just ask that I am given the chance, when possible, to open the minds of those with questions. I am happy to do it.

I am very aware that sometimes it is not easy to remember that I am legally blind. Frequently, I hear this from my own friends and some family members. My mom jokes with me that when we travel together or go somewhere, that she is my biggest danger because she forgets and then walks in front of me, cuts me off, starts pointing at things for me to look at (or find)
etc. I fully understand that because I look “normal” it is easy to forget, until something happens and I get hurt. I am legally blind, but that does not mean that I see nothing. It means I need assistance. In fact, I may need your help one day.

So why should you care? Besides being a good and compassionate human being, according to Visionaware.org, “new research from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine reveals that the annual number of new cases of blindness and low vision among people aged 45 years and older is estimated to double during the next 30 years.” Translation, you or someone you love may be impacted by low vision. Having a clear and accurate understanding about the reality and truth of living with low vision will better prepare you now and for the future.

Vision loss does not have to be the end of the world. Although feelings of isolation, loneliness and depression are a constant threat, the small steps that the sighted world takes to understand vision loss will make the lives of us affected that much easier. With your help and understanding, those of us living with low vision will continue to not just live with low vision, but SUCCEED with low vision.

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held March 4, 2019 at 9:30at the Bedford Free Methodist Church. Present were Regina and Rich Vonderhaar, Doug and Brenda Eads, Denise Mullis, Rita Kersh, Mike and Dolly Sowder, Jon Knoll, Norma Thomas, and Loney and Ida Galey.

Our speaker was Rebecca Chambers, social services director at Garden Villa in Bedford. She talked to us about some of the assistance they give visually impaired residents in things like eating, dressing themselves and navigating in their rooms and around the facility. Our own Jon Knoll, who is a resident there, shared some of his positive experiences. We decided to
give raised dice and lined pads of paper from the SCAVI store to Garden Villa.

We approved February minutes. Dolly Motioned Rita seconded. Regina talked about our next meeting at Pappas Restaurant, Wal-Mart grocery pick up and suggestions for future speakers. Rita motioned to adjourn, Dolly seconded. Meeting adjourned at 10:15. Respectfully submitted by Rich Vonderhaar

SCAVI News for March 2019

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook | Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh. Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065 Cell 317-435-8216
Email Regina Vonderhaar

What’s Happening in SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, March 4, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our speaker will be Rebecca Chambers, Social Service Director at Garden Villa in Bedford. She will be talking to us about working with visually impaired residents who live there.

SCAVI Birthdays

Kathy Reising and Dolly Sowder, March 10

5 Ways to Keep Your Eyes Healthy Every Day by Sheryl Kraft

As we age, our eyes age too, and the risk of eye diseases and conditions-many with no warning signs-climbs. That’s why experts stress the importance of an annual comprehensive eye exam for everyone over age 50. “Just as you’d visit an internist for your annual health check-up, it’s equally important to have your eyes checked each year-even if you’re not experiencing any vision problems,” says Divya Srikumaran, M.D., medical director at Johns Hopkins’ Wilmer Eye Institute in Odenton, Maryland. Though it’s true that early detection and treatment can help protect-and even save-your vision, so can living a healthy life. “Keeping your eyes healthy is as important as keeping the rest of you healthy,” says Michelle Andreoli, M.D., clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. These tips can help.

1. Don’t Smoke-or Hang Around Secondhand Smoke. The links between smoking and heart disease and lung cancer are well known. But did you know that smoking-or being exposed to secondhand smoke-also can harm your eyes and lead to vision loss. Smoking interferes with the manufacture of a chemical necessary to help you see at night. It also increases the risk for many major eye disorders, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and cataracts The proof is in the numbers: Smokers have a four times greater risk of developing AMD than nonsmokers. If you live with a smoker, your risk for AMD is still high (it almost doubles). Heavy smokers (more than 15 cigarettes per day) also have a three times greater risk of developing cataracts than do nonsmokers.

2. Eat a Healthy Diet. Is it an old wives’ tale that eating carrots is good for your eyes? Not exactly. While carrots can’t improve your eyesight, they can keep your vision healthy, thanks to vitamin A. But A is not the only vitamin good for your eyes, says registered dietitian Bonnie Taub-Dix, author of Read It Before You Eat It: Taking You From Label to Table.

“The foods we eat have a tremendous impact on our eye health. Green leafy vegetables and eggs are both high in lutein and zeaxanthin, nutrients that have been found to reduce the risk of chronic eye diseases like AMD and cataracts,” she says. Other eye-healthy foods include salmon, a potent source of omega-3 fatty acids; Brussels sprouts and grapefruit, rich in vitamin C; nuts and seeds, which contain vitamin E; and shellfish and whole grains, powerful sources of zinc, which transports vitamin A from the liver to the retina to produce melanin, a protective pigment in the eye. The Mediterranean diet has been associated with helping slow the
progression of AMD, according to a 2017 study. It includes fruits, vegetables, fatty fish like salmon and sardines, olive oil, nuts and other healthy fats.

3. Cover Up. Sunglasses and hats are more than just fashion accessories. They help protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, which can cause molecular damage and increase the risk for AMD and cataracts. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends wearing dark sunglasses that block 99 or 100 percent of all UV light. Some labels will say “UV absorption up to 400 nm,” which means there is 100 percent UV absorption. If your glasses aren’t at 100 percent, plastic and glass lenses can be treated with a special chemical to improve their UV absorption rating. Note: Polarized lenses are not the same as UV protective lenses. They have a
special filter for reducing glare, but may not provide maximum UV protection.

4. Exercise. We all know it’s good for mood, metabolism and overall health, but exercise can decrease the risk of many eye conditions, including cataracts, wet age-related AMD and glaucoma, research says. In fact, people who regularly exercise three or more times a week have a lower risk of developing wet age-related AMD (a more serious type in which blood vessels leak fluid and blood under the retina and can damage central vision), according to a study published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

“As AMD progresses, it may be harder to read or to drive at night, and objects may not be as bright as they used to be,” says Craig See, M.D., an ophthalmologist at Cleveland Clinic’s Cole Eye Institute. Exercise also benefits your eyes because it can decrease your risk of developing other health problems that can lead to vision problems, like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

5. Keep Blood Sugar in Check. If you have diabetes and your blood sugar is too high for too long, the blood vessels in your retina can swell, leak or grow abnormally, affecting vision in both eyes, says See. The longer you’ve had diabetes, the greater your risk is of developing an eye disease known as diabetic retinopathy, which can affect anyone with Type 1, Type 2 or gestational diabetes and is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. “People with well-controlled sugars will probably never have the complication of eye problems from their diabetes,” See says, which is why careful management is so crucial. Diabetes also can put you at risk for developing glaucoma and cataracts, Andreoli says.

AMD In age-related macular degeneration, damage to a part of the retina known as the macula causes a loss in central vision. Currently, treatment exists only for one type, wet AMD, which is less common but more serious. Cataracts occur when there is a breakdown in normal proteins in the lens of the eye, which naturally happens around age 40 and worsens in time, causing cloudy, blurry or double vision, light sensitivity and trouble seeing well at night. Glaucoma Pressure from the buildup of fluid in the front part of the eye causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve. Eye pain, blurred vision and eye redness are symptoms. Diabetic Retinopathy Uncontrolled high blood sugar can damage blood vessels in the retina. Symptoms can include vision loss, spots or dark floaters and reduced color vision.

SCAVI Minutes

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held February 4, 2019 at 9:35 a.m. at the Bedford Free Methodist Church. Present were Cindy Brooking, Jim Veam, Regina and Rich Vonderhaar, Doug and Brenda Eads, Denise Mullis, Rita Kersh, Mike and Dolly Sowder, and Jon Knoll.

Our speaker was Tina Ligman from Lawrence County Cancer Services. She informed us they have been helping cancer patients in Lawrence County since 1994. They are separate from American Cancer Society. Their services include help with transportation, providing hats and wigs for those who have lost hair, Patient support such as visits, flowers, financial support and equipment such as walkers, wheelchairs and shower chairs.

Dolly made the motioned to approve the January minutes, Rita seconded, and the motion passed. Cindy gave treasurer’s report: Dues $9 $10Sunshine bag, Account balance $3294.77. Regina told about the new Lawrence county personal transport service. Regina asked about having an April evening eating out with everyone in agreement to do it. The motion to adjourn was made by Jon, Rita seconded, and the motion passed. The meeting adjourned at 10:24 a.m. Respectfully Submitted by Rich Vonderhaar.

SCAVI News for February 2019

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook
Newsletter written and produced by President Regina Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh.
Regina may be reached at 812-675-0065 – Cell 317-435-8216 – Email Regina Vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, February 4, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our speaker will be Tina Ligman from Lawrence County Cancer Services. She will be talking about what they offer.

SCAVI Birthdays

  • Mary Lou Barnes Feb. 7
  • Maggie Fleener Feb. 10
  • Sonnie Henderson Feb. 24

Winter Weather

This is just a reminder especially to our newer members and guests that whenever NLCS schools are closed SCAVI does not meet. The weather has been good to us so far lets keep it going in February and March.

SEVERE EYE CONDITIONS CAUSED BY OVER THE COUNTER COLD MEDICINES CAUSING SEVERE FORM OF GLAUCOMA

By: Jessica Dupnack

Imagine waking up to blurry vision and excruciating eye pain. Then your eye care professional says it’s the cold medicine you’re taking that’s causing this pain and a form of Glaucoma. It’s more common than you think and most of us haven’t even heard of the warnings. If you get this form of Glaucoma the only solution is a needle in your eye, literally. “We insert a very small needle into the eye and that will break the attack by lowering the pressure in the eye,” Dr. Siegel said.

Take this as a warning from Dr. Siegel this cold and flu season. “If you should be taking this medication or any other medication and notice you are feeling pressure or discomfort around your eyes you should stop it and see an eye care professional.”

Check your labels, look for warnings that say not to take or consult a doctor if you have Glaucoma, and get your eyes checked to see if you’re at high risk.

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held January 7, 2019 at 9:35 A.M. at the Bedford Free Methodist Church. Present were Ida and Loney Galey, Cindy Brooking, Jim Veam, Regina and Rich Vonderhaar, Doug and Brenda Eads, Denise Mullis, Rita Kersh, Mike and Dolly Sowder, Don and Betty Schackmann, and Kathy Reising.

Our speaker was Jim McCreary from the Bedford Police Department. He spoke about the Smart 911 program which has been in Bedford for 18 months. It allows individuals to enter personal and medical information in to the 911 system. Jim passed out application forms and also told how to apply online.

Regina told us we have Thornton Park shelter house reserved for our picnic. Rita made the motion to approve the Nov. minutes, Doug seconded and the motion passed.

Cindy gave the treasurer’s report. December Income $172.80 from Auction, donation $3, sunshine $7 Dues $90 total $272.80 Account balance December 31, 2018: $2,925.78. January 2019 Income, donation from Evening Lions $400.

Dolly asked about getting Uber. She also passed out ACBI car project cards. The meeting adjourned at 10:40 a.m. Respectfully submitted by Rich Vonderhaar

SCAVI NEWS for January 2019

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook Newsletter written and produced by President Rich Vonderhaar and Edited by
Rita Kersh. Rich may be reached at 812-675-0065, Cell 317-709-8159 Email Rich vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, January 7, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our speaker will be from the Bedford Police Department talking about the Smart 911 program. Those who wish can bring their phones and get signed up at the meeting. Feel free to bring a guest as this topic should have community interest.

SCAVI BIRTHDAYS

Doug Eads Jan. 1
Louise Hamilton Jan. 14

THANKS FOR ANOTHER GREAT YEAR BY PRESIDENT RICH VONDERHAAR

As one of my final duties as SCAVI president, I wanted to thank everyone for another great year. This group is successful because of so many wonderful people working together. That is also where we get our enthusiasm and personality. We had great meetings, speakers, a picnic, night out at a restaurant and Christmas. In addition we have grown with four new members. 2019 should be even better. Regina Vonderhaar is excited about serving as president while I take a year off to kind of charge my battery a bit.

SMITHSONIAN OFFERS TOURS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED BY VICTORIA SANCHEZ

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is offering ways for people with different abilities to explore and enjoy the artwork, history and culture in Washington D.C. Docent-led tours for the visually impaired are opening new opportunities for locals.

People from all over the world travel to the Nation’s Capital. So far, more than two million visitors this year from around the world have walked the halls of the American Art Museum and got a peek in to the lives of Americans past and present. Some residents felt they were not able to enjoy the venue like everyone else.

“This collection is a reflection of who we are as Americans. It tells a history of our culture and our people and it does it visually,” said Carol Wilson, Lunder Education Chair at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

One Thursday afternoon, a small group started a docent-led tour. Some arm in arm, leisurely strolled down one of the halls. “When we walk into that gallery, we will be surrounded by people staring at us because these are portraits,” explained museum docent David Weisz.

Exhibits for sight alone can cause some visitors to feel isolated. “I would go into a museum and I would feel lost, many times depressed. Like, this is not for me. They don’t want me here. And now I leave and I have these images in my head which I can refer to many times for weeks, even years later,” said Kilof Legge.

Legally Blind Legged is not alone. “Kilof, what do you see? Because I just see a bunch of colors,” said visually impaired visitor John Guzik as he looked at a painting. “At this point I can’t drive, read, recognize people,” explained Legge. “I tell people, it’s like I see one piece of a 1,000-piece puzzle,” said Jane Stanley. “If your vision is a circle, I have an M&M in the middle,” explained Guzik.

In the monthly tour at the museum, all the participants are visually impaired. Stereotypical canes and blacked out sunglasses are nowhere to be found. While the group does walk slower, they travel with confidence and help each other out. “Surfaces change, so be careful. And it’s a little bit, slightly downhill,” Weisz said as he was leading the group out of a doorway.

“I look like I can see a lot more than I see. I guess I just want to see more so I try,” said Stanley warmly. The tours have specially trained docents that use colorful and descriptive words. They pass around touchable object like marble. “Even though it’s cold, it’s not the hardest rock. It’s a soft rock compared to a lot of others,” said Weisz as the participants were passing the white block around.

“The beauty of a work of art is you can experience it even if you can’t see it.” – Carol Wilson, Smithsonian American Art Museum. Visually impaired visitors are experiencing art in other ways besides sight at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

At the next artwork, Weisz took out a painter’s palette with multiple 3D painted brushstrokes and pointed out which one resembled the painting they were studying. He also played music inspired by piece. “All the spectacular things going on and you’re going to hear in a minute the waves. The wind and the waves,” Weisz said over the orchestra music coming from his phone.

Some paintings and sculptures have foam-board cutouts for fingers to follow along as it’s being described. It brings the unseen piece to life. “In this area here, we have some trees. They are dark, very beautifully painted, very detail painted. And in the background, I’m going to move you up here, this is a combination up here of sky and mountains,” Weisz described to Stanley as he helped guide her hand around the foam board.

“Having somebody describe what you’re seeing, I think is an amazing service that the museum provides,” said Guzik. While many visitors spend a few moments looking at a piece, this group gets to experience more than what’s on the surface. “The beauty of a work of art is you can experience it even if you can’t see it,” said Wilson.

Artwork so often creates a space for discussion, learning and community. For the visually impaired, that faded away until now. “It’s stimulating and it adds an extra dimension to my life that was missing,” said Stanley. “Now I leave and I have these images in my head which I can refer to many times for weeks, even years later,” said Legge.

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held on Monday, November 5, 2018 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari Goodman, Cindy Brooking, Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Brenda and Doug Eads, Mike and Dolly Sowder, Betty and Don Schackmann, Jim Veem, Kathy Reising and Ida Galey.

We opened the meeting by going around the room and taking roll. Regina made a motion to approve the minutes from the October meeting. Brenda seconded the motion. The motion passed.

Treasurer’s Report

The balance was $2805.70 according to the bank as of the date of the meeting. We raised $1169.36 from the chili supper. We also received a $40 donation from the ACBI from the letter writing campaign. SCAVI made $432 on auction items from the convention, 40% of which will come back to our chapter. We discussed reimbursing Rita for the candy bars she purchased for the
SCAVI table. Kari made a motion to reimburse Rita. Dolly seconded the motion. The motion passed.

Next, Rich opened up the topic of our annual election. There were two positions open, president and board member. The only nominee for president was Regina Vonderhaar and the only nominee for board member was Denise Mullis. The floor was opened up for additional nominees, no more were presented. The slate was presented and unanimously approved.

Rich recapped the weekend at Indianapolis at convention. He thanked everyone who helped with every aspect of the convention. Rich reminded everyone that dues are being collected for 2019. Also, the sunshine bag was passed around. Rich opened up the floor for any additional comments or questions. We adjourned the meeting at 10:35 am.

Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman

SCAVI NEWS for November 2018

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook

Newsletter written and produced by President Rich Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh. Rich may be reached at 812-675-0065. Cell 317-709-8159
Email Rich Vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be our Christmas party, Saturday, December 8, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 12:00 P.M. SCAVI will furnish the meat, paper products and drinks. Members are
encouraged to bring a side dish or dessert. Those participating in the game should bring a wrapped gift worth around $5. So let’s end a successful year with some Christmas fun.

SCAVI BIRTHDAYS
Ruth Pruett Dec. 11, 100 years young, congratulations Ruth
Kari Goodman Dec. 28

DUES REMINDER
While most of our members have already paid 2019 dues, here’s just a quick reminder. those who have not paid should either bring their annual $9 to the Christmas party or send it to the above P.O. Box with your check made out to SCAVI.

SCAVI IMPACTS JOINT CONVENTION
For those not fortunate enough to have attended the 2018 joint convention with Indiana and Ohio, you might be both interested and proud to hear the positive impact SCAVI had on its success. Since Indiana was the host
state, we had the greater share of the responsibility. From the beginning, our members hit the ground running. Rita Kersh, Kari Goodman and Cindy
Brooking were on the planning committee while Dolly Sowder coordinated the exhibits. Once we got to Indianapolis, we all really got busy. Ten members of SCAVI attended as well as two guests. Right away we got to work setting up tables, filling goody bags and taking registrations. Throughout the convention we took turns selling various items at our SCAVI table. Our members were also very helpful to those needing assistance at the hotel. The best part was it was all done with enthusiasm and a positive attitude SCAVI has come to be famous for.

ACB NEWS
We’re writing to share some exciting news from our friends at Aira. We’re excited to announce a special shopping opportunity exclusively for ACB members who are Aira Explorers. Aira is offering ACB members 120 minutes of free Aira service for any tasks related to shopping, valid from (Black Friday) through to Christmas, December 25, 2018. How can I take advantage of this offer? 1. Be both an ACB member and an Aira Explorer.
2. Connect with an Aira agent and ask them to add “ACB Member” to your profile.
3. Go shopping with Aira! Make sure you tell the agent that you’re an ACB Member and that you’re using the ACB Shopping Promotion. ACB affiliates should reach out to their members to explain how the offer works, and to ensure members know to update their Aira profiles to reflect their ACB membership. Get ready to make the most of your shopping this holiday season with Aira! Remember, as an ACB Member you’re getting 120 minutes of free Aira service, valid from Black Friday through Christmas. Just make sure an Aira agent adds “ACB Member” to your profile!

SCAVI Minutes
The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held on Monday, October 5, 2018 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari Goodman, Cindy Brooking, Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Brenda and Doug
Eads, Mike and Dolly Sowder, Betty and Don Schackmann, Jim Veem, Kathy Reising and Ida Galey. We opened the meeting by going around the room and taking roll.

October Minutes
Regina made a motion to approve the minutes from the October meeting. Brenda seconded the motion. The motion passed. Treasurer’s Report: The balance was $2805.70 according to the bank as of the date of the meeting. We raised $1169.36 from the chili supper. We also received a $40 donation from the ACBI from the letter writing campaign. SCAVI made $432 on auction items from the convention, 40% of which will come back to our chapter. We discussed reimbursing Rita for the candy bars she purchased for the SCAVI table. Kari made a motion to reimburse Rita. Dolly seconded the motion. The motion passed. Next, Rich opened up the topic of our annual election. There were two positions open, president and board member. The only nominee for president was Regina Vonderhaar and the only nominee for board member was Denise Mullis. The floor was opened up for additional nominees, no more were presented. The slate was presented and unanimously approved.

Rich recapped the weekend at Indianapolis at convention. He thanked everyone who helped with every aspect of the convention. Rich reminded everyone that dues are being collected for 2019. Also, the sunshine bag was passed around. Rich opened up the floor for any additional comments or questions. Our next meeting will be our Christmas party on December 8 at noon at the Free Methodist Church. SCAVI will provide meat and drinks. Members are encouraged to bring a side and a $5 gift for a gift exchange. Guests are welcome to attend and join in the fun.

We adjourned the meeting at 10:35 am. Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman.

SCAVI NEWS for October 2018

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook
Newsletter written and produced by President Rich Vonderhaar and Edited by
Rita Kersh. Rich may be reached at 812-675-0065, Cell 317-709-8159 or
Email Rich Vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, November 5, at the Bedford Free Methodist
Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our agenda will include highlights from the ACBI convention. We will also
have our annual election. SCAVI BIRTHDAYS: Rita Kersh Nov. 2

SUCCESSFUL CHILI SUPPER

Thanks to all who cooked, served, set up and cleaned up. Plus, all who came
and ate and supported our chili supper making it a huge success. And what a
great time we all had. The hard work and dedication of many gave 96 people
a fun evening.

DUES

Just a reminder that 2019 dues will be collected beginning in November. Mail to
SCAVI
P.O. Box 2216
Bedford, IN 47421

IT JUST TAKES ONE

By Rita Kersh

First I want to thank all the hard workers who helped with our recent chili
supper and silent auction. Without each of you it wouldn’t have been a
success. Just imagine how many people with vision loss we can help!

Now, along the lines of fund raising, I want to bring up an easy fund raiser. Each one of us can do and it takes hardly any time at all to do it. The American Council of the Blind of Indiana (ACBI), our state organization, has an annual letter writing fund raiser. Every year a letter goes out to people who have agreed to be financial supporters of our state organization. These people were asked by our members if they would like to be supporters. There is no set amount they have to donate; it’s entirely up to them.

I recently got on my Facebook page and contacted people I’m friends with and
I also e-mailed some people as well. So far I’ve heard from three who will
do the annual donation and two are giving me a one-time donation. There
still may be a few more I hear from.

So, if I can do this, each of you can do this. It just takes you contacting
one person who would like to be a supporter. And remember, a portion of the
donation they donate will come back to our SCAVI chapter. You should let
them know their donation is tax deductable, since we’re a non-profit organization.

If any of you have supporters who would like to help out with this fund
raiser, please get their mailing address and send it to me. I’ll pass it
along to the one who sends out these letters. Remember, it just takes one.

REMINDER TOLAWRENCE COUNTY VOTERS

With the November 6 election approaching, we wanted to remind our readers
that all voting places in Indiana have the talking voting machines which
enable visually impaired voters to vote independently. A visually impaired
voter should ask to use a talking machine because poll workers don’t always
think to offer the service. The American Council of the Blind was
instrumental in making this service available.

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was
held on Monday, October 1, 2018 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free
Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari Goodman,
Cindy Brooking, Sue Fleenor, Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Denise
Mullis, Doug Eads, Kathy Reising, Mike and Dolly Sowders, Betty and Don
Shackmann, Jim Veem and Lonnie and Ida Galey.

Rich opened up by seeing who needed tickets to sell for the chili supper.
Rita provided an update on silent auction items. Rich talked about possible new speakers and fundraising opportunities. Rich announced that next month we have to start with election of officers, and he will be stepping down as president. Rich assigned Regina, Dolly and
Rita to a nominating committee before November elections. Next, we discussed the state convention coming up in November. Rich made sure everyone who was interested has registered, has hotel reservations and has transportation.

September Minutes

Rita made a motion to approve the minutes from the August meeting. Regina
seconded the motion. The motion passed.

Treasurer’s Report

The beginning balance was $1952.54. Income was $36 in chili supper tickets, $30 for washcloths, $11 for the sunshine fund and $0.08 in interest. Expenses were $20.43 and $40.65 for auction items and $3.50 in postage to mail chili supper tickets to Brenda. Ending balance of $1965.04. Regina made a motion to approve the treasurer’s report. Sue seconded the
motion. The motion passed.

We discussed all the details for the chili supper. Cindy passed the sunshine bag. Rich opened the meeting up for anyone to share or ask questions. Our next meeting will be November 5 at 9:30 at the Free Methodist Church. We adjourned the meeting at 10:35 am. Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman

SCAVI NEWS for September 2018

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SVAVI on Facebook

Newsletter written and produced by President Rich Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh.
Rich may be reached at 812-675-0065
Cell 317-709-8159
Email rich Vonderhaar

October 2018 WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, October 1, at the Bedford Free Methodist
Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our agenda will include final preparations for our upcoming chili supper, final arrangements for ACBI State Convention as well as talking about November’s upcoming election.

SCAVI BIRTHDAYS

  • Sue Fleener Oct. 10
  • Cindy Brooking Oct. 16
  • Rich Vonderhaar Oct. 17

CHILI EXTRAVAGANZA

Lawrence County asked for it, and we’re going to do it! Back by popular demand, we are having our Chili Extravaganza in conjunction with White Cane Day on October 15 from 5:00 to 7:00 P.M. at the First Baptist Church, 1515 20th street in Bedford.

Tickets are $6 in advance or at the door, $3 for children ages 6 to 12 and children under 6 eat free. Tickets are also available from SCAVI members. We had so much fun with this event in the past, we had to bring it back. We are looking forward to an evening of good food and fun. There will also be a silent auction.

MEDICAL ADVANCES IN MACULAR DEGENERATION By Robert Weisman, BOSTON GLOBE

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was
held on Monday, September 10, 2018 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free
Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari Goodman,
Cindy Brooking, Sue Fleener, Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Denise
Mullis, Doug and Brenda Eads, Kathy Reising, Mike and Dolly Sowders and
Lonnie and Ida Galey.

August Minutes

Sue made a motion to approve the minutes from the August meeting. Regina
seconded the motion. The motion passed.

Treasurer’s Report

Recent expenses were a $50 check to reserve the room for the October chili
supper and $14 to ACBI for dues. There are some outstanding receipts that
were turned in today for approximately $61. This leaves our balance roughly
at $1980. Rita made a motion to approve the treasurer’s report. Doug seconded the
motion. The motion passed.

Next, we discussed details about the upcoming chili supper we are holding
on October 15 from 5:00-7:00 at the First Baptist Church in Bedford. Cindy
is going to print up tickets and distribute them to everyone to sell. Members will gather and donate items for the silent auction.

We determined ticket prices would be $6, $3 for children between the ages of 6-12 and free for children 5 and under. Our menu will be different types of chili, cornbread, sandwiches and dessert. We discussed purchasing tea and lemonade for drinks and some different options for having coffee as well. Dolly will inventory our paper supplies to determine what else needs to be purchased before the event.

Rich shared about our convention coming up on November 2-4 at the
Waterfront Hotel in Indianapolis. We discussed transportation to the
convention. Rita passed out registration forms for the convention.

A motion was introduced for SCAVI to pay $50 towards registration fees for
each member attending the convention. The motion passed. Cindy will
collect information and register everyone for the convention. Anyone who
has already registered will get a reimbursement for the $50. Kari and Rita
donated their reimbursement to go towards the pizza mixer.

Rich opened the meeting up for anyone to share or ask questions. Our next meeting will be October 1 at 9:30 at the Free Methodist Church. Rita made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Brenda seconded the motion. The motion passed. We adjourned the meeting at 10:35 am.
Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman

SCAVI NEWS for August 2018

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook

Newsletter written and produced by President Rich Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh.
Rich may be reached at 812-675-0065. Cell 317-709-8159. Email rich vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, September 10 (due to the Labor Day holiday), at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. We will be discussing plans for our chapter for the rest of 2018.

SCAVI BIRTHDAYS

  • Sally Ridge Sept. 2
  • Brenda Eads Sept. 15
  • Regina Vonderhaar Sept. 24

MAKE PLANS FOR THE STATE CONVENTION By Rita Kersh, Chair, Convention planning committee

Coming soon in your “Focus on ACBI” newsletter will be everything you need to know about the convention coming up the weekend of November 2-4 in Indianapolis. There will be something for just about everyone. Our big attraction is the tour of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. We’ll have over 20 vendors and exhibitors to visit. Our auction is always a big hit and there are super nice items to bid on. Several of our SCAVI members are planning on attending so we’re working on transportation for those who need it. For participants with hearing problems there will be Assistive Listening Devices that will allow the individual using it to hear the people using the microphones. If you have question, please let me know. I hope to see most of our chapter members in Indianapolis!

INSPIRATIONAL POEM

Denise Mullis was kind enough to read the following poem at our last meeting. We thought we would share it in this newsletter for those who were
not in attendance.

If nobody smiled and nobody helped us along,
If everybody looked after himself and good things all went to the strong;
if nobody cared just a little for you and nobody thought of me,
and we all stood alone in the battle of life what a dreary old world this would be

Life is sweet just because of the friends we have made and the things which in common we share,
we want to live on not because of our selfishness but because of the people who care;
it’s giving and doing for somebody else on that all life’s splendor depends,
and the joy of this world when it’s all added up is found in the making of friends.

TRANSPORTATION UPDATE BY RICH VONDERHAAR

At our July meeting, we were fortunate to have Lisa Salyers from Rural Transit tell us about their service. Earlier this month Regina and I used the service to go from Bedford to Olive Garden in Bloomington and found their service both helpful and easy to use. At first I was a bit hesitant to put my personal experience in this newsletter, but after some thought the idea struck me that finding reliable transportation is an ongoing problem of the visually impaired. That isn’t a complaint, but it is a fact. SCAVI is all about sharing things to help one another. That is what we do, that is what we are about, that is why we are strong. Perhaps this little bit of positive news will help someone sometime.

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held on Monday, August 6, 2018 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Rich and Regina Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Denise Mullis, Don and Betty Shackmann, Mike and Dolly Sowder. Rich and Denise informed the group about members who were sick. We conducted a support session for new members in which Brenda, Dolly and Rita told their stories about sight loss. Regina made a motion to approve July minutes, Brenda seconded and the motion passed. We began planning for our October chili supper. We adjourned the meeting at 10:45 am. Respectfully Submitted by President Rich Vonderhaar

SCAVI Newsletter for July 2018

A monthly newsletter of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired
SCAVI, P.O. Box 2216, Bedford, IN 47421
SCAVI on Facebook
Newsletter written and produced by President Rich Vonderhaar and Edited by Rita Kersh. Rich may be reached at 812-675-0065
Cell 317-709-8159 Email rich vonderhaar

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SCAVI

Our next meeting will be Monday, August 6, at the Bedford Free Methodist Church, 630 R Street in the Fellowship Hall in the basement at 9:30 A.M. Our activities will include a support activity and planning our October chili supper event. SCAVI BIRTHDAYS: Mike Sowder August 5

ITEMS DONATED

After the passing of our long time member and friend Bill Henderson, his wife, Sonnie, was kind enough to donate several items of adaptive equipment for the visually impaired to SCAVI which had belonged to Bill. Anyone interested who could benefit from these items should contact Mike and Dolly Sowder at 812-279-1669.

Here is a list of these items: Signature guide; Binocular magnifier goes around your head; Zoom Text, magnifier reader Disc; Scrip talk, reads special labels put on by the pharmacy; Path Way to Independence paper back; Audacious puzzle book (2 CD’s); Learn keys, verbal keyboard Feedback (1 Disc); Talking type writer CD; Verbal view for windows XP; Master visually xp for windows XP CD; Ruby magnifier; Optronro CCTV; 4 white canes.

UPDATE ON OUR UPCOMING JOINT STATE CONVENTION

By Rita Kersh

Recently, Cindy Brooking, Barbara Salisbury (ACBI President) and I had a meeting with the Waterfront Hotel owner/manager and his colleagues at the hotel. Details were discussed and we were invited to take a quick tour.
Since our ACBI board meeting that was held at the hotel the end of April there has been a big change in the appearance of the hotel. The main hallway has had the old carpet removed and new flooring down, there is new lighting in the hall with colorful ceiling lights, and it has been painted as well. The ballroom has been painted and has new carpeting and the lighting is very good. There were carpenters still working on one end of the large room. So far there have been 35 guest rooms literally stripped and new flooring, walls, mattresses, etc. put in the rooms. In the areas that have been renovated the public restrooms have new print/Braille signage. The atrium/solarium is pretty and several rooms overlook this area which is where the pool is also located. It’s just a very great atmosphere now. I’m excited that we’ll be at this hotel in November.

We’ll have the tour of the Speedway museum and Kiss the Bricks; a pizza mixer; talent show; audio described comedy show; the auction and a impressive list of speakers/presenters. I hope we have a good showing of SCAVI members at the convention this year. I think everyone will be pleased.

TRANSPORTATION AND DELIVERY SERVICE OPTIONS FOR BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED

The ACB Membership Committee has compiled a list of transportation and delivery service options which we hope will help make getting around and getting things done a little easier. This is not an exhaustive list. Please check with your state and local affiliate for other transportation or delivery services in your area.

Uber Technologies, Inc. is a global transportation technology company headquartered in San Francisco, California, operating in 633 cities worldwide. It develops, markets, and operates the Uber car transportation and food delivery mobile apps. Uber provides safe, reliable rides in minutes, with no reservations required. To sign up or to see if Uber is available in your city, go to Uber.com

Lyft is a transportation network company based in San Francisco, California. It develops markets and operates the Lyft car transportation mobile app. Lyft operates in approximately 300 U.S. cities, including New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Lyft provides safe, reliable transportation, and you can schedule a ride up to seven days in advance and relax knowing your ride will be there when you need it. For more information or to sign up for this service, go to www.lyft.com

GoGoGrandparent offers affordable transportation for seniors, using Uber and Lyft vehicles. They charge a higher fee since they book your ride for you, and you don’t need a smart phone app. For more information or to sign up, go to GoGoGrandParent.com
or call 1-855-464-6872

Some larger cities offer bus, train or taxi services.
Obtaining rides with friends and family members or drivers for hire might also be a feasible transportation option.

Delivery Services

Instacart is a same-day grocery delivery service. Customers select groceries through a web application from various retailers and delivered by a personal shopper. To sign up for this service, go to Instacart.com

Kmart offers delivery of their products to your home. For more information or to order products, visit http://www.kmart.com or call 1-800-732-7747.

Walgreens Mail Service works with your insurance plan to offer free delivery of prescriptions through the mail directly to you. Prescriptions can be ordered online, by mail, or over the telephone. For more information, visit Walgreens.com or call 1-800-345-1985.

Walmart, CVS and Rite-Aid Pharmacies offer prescription delivery options to qualified customers. Listed below are their respective websites and telephone numbers:
Walmart.com – 800-273-3455
CVS.com – 800-746-7287
RiteAid.com – 800-748-3243

Many retail chains deliver products ordered online. Many restaurants offer delivery services as well. Please check your local area listings for possible retail chain and restaurant delivery options. Note: Some transportation and delivery services might have a disability line that you can call.

SCAVI MINUTES

The meeting of the South Central Association of the Visually Impaired was held on Monday, July 9, 2018 at 9:30 am in the basement of the Free Methodist Church fellowship hall. Present at the meeting were Kari Goodman, Cindy Brooking, Jim Veem, Rich Vonderhaar, Rita Kersh, Denise Mullis, Don and Betty Shackmann, Mike and Dolly Sowders, Lonnie Gilley and our guest speaker Lisa Salyers with Rural Transit.

Rich opened up our meeting by having everyone introduce themselves. He then introduced Lisa Salyeres. Lisa described what Rural Transit is and how their transportation services could benefit the members of our group. She answered questions and passed out a pamphlet with more information. We also discussed the possibility of using Rural Transit for our trip to convention.

May Minutes

Rita made a motion to approve the minutes from the May meeting. Denise seconded the motion. The motion passed.

Treasurer’s Report

In May, the beginning balance was $2121.43. Checks were made out to ACBI for $140 for dues, ACB for #25 for the Brenda Dillon memorial walk, and the ACBI for our convention contribution. That makes total expenses $190. With interest of $0.09 our ending balance for May was $1931.52.

In June, the beginning balance was $1931.52
Expenses were $50 for the shelter house for the picnic and $67.22 to JayC for food for the picnic. The ending balance for June is 1841.30.

Rich talked to the group about the talking TV boxes that DirectTv and Comcast are offering the blind and visually impaired at no cost. These boxes make finding TV shows and audio described program accessible.

Rich shared about our convention coming up on November 2-4 at the Waterfront Hotel in Indianapolis. We discussed ideas for what SCAVI can put into the auction this year. We will be doing a coffee basket and a wine basket. Other items are welcome to auction off as well.

The Heartland Chapter of the ACBI in Bloomington has invited our group to a presentation about Aira at the Monroe County Public Library on July 16th from 6:30-9:00. Anyone who is interested in learning about Aira is welcome to attend.

Rich opened the meeting up for anyone to share or ask questions. Our next meeting will be August 6 at 9:30 at the Free Methodist Church.
We adjourned the meeting at 10:50 am. Respectfully Submitted by Secretary Kari Goodman